Inspired by Books That I’ve Bought of Late on Savidge Reads

Simon’s post is a rundown of books he’s bought recently with a commentary of why he bought them. It gives a different side of him as a reader.

He rightly points out that ‘book blogging’ and ‘free books’ are seen by some as synonymous, which is unfair and slightly insulting to lots of book bloggers who have never had a ‘free book’ from a publisher.

‘Free books’ aka ‘advance reading copies’, as I understand it, come out of an author’s marketing budget so they won’t receive royalties on the copies that are sent out to create awareness of that book.

The point really of review copies is they aren’t ‘free’ but they are given in exchange for raising awareness of a book’s existence. This is why some bloggers get more books than others and as I said in my last post, I’m very privileged.

The books publishers send out are part of a pre-publication marketing cycle. People get selected to receive certain books at a certain time, which often make book blogs look very generic.

Now, I have no problem with that. I like a lot of the books I get sent and would happily recommend reading them. I’m a third into The Rhesus Chart and on prior performance I’m hoping I’ll be shouting about how good it is. But I also have my own tastes and whims, which is satisfied by buying books in one form or another.

And there are good reasons for me doing it – I like browsing and finding books, paying means that both the author and shop get revenue so they can write and sell more books in future (I’m a lover of short fiction and try to buy a lot of it because I want to add to sales numbers and have more to buy in future). And most importantly, paying dispels any obligation (publishers large or small are professionals I try and treat them as such) implied or otherwise – like I said the advance reading copies aren’t ‘free’.

And with that out of the way look at this pile of joy (I’ll be listing some ebooks in a Part Two):

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Charlaine Harris’s Dead Until Dark, Lilly Bard Mysteries Omnibus & Harper Connelly Omnibus. I’ve read some of Harris’s Teagarden Mysteries and recently enjoyed Midnight Crossroad. There is something about her writing style which is soothing and enjoyable, so I thought I’d stock up (that’s a theme in my book buying) and as Midnight Crossroad has a lot of intertextually it seemed like a good reason to explore her other works. When I’m thinking of buying books a level of OCD kicks in. Here it looked like the Lilly Bard Omnibus was on the verge of being OOP (it was published a while ago and is now out as single volumes). I got the last copy from Waterstones online. The Book People have been selling the Sookie Stackhouse Mysteries as a bundle of ten for £9.99 (I think) for ages. That leaves Harper so why not complete the set?

Votan and other novels: this one is easy as it’s the next in the new Fantasy Masterworks series (see precious post on historical speculative fiction) and I’ve got the aim of collecting and reading them all.

Unquenchable Fire, Ammonite and Sarah Canary: The obvious reason is they are all SF Masterworks (again see previous post) but also they are from the under-represented group: women. I’m trying to balance my SFM collection as best I can to have a high percentage of women’s SF, which is hard as they don’t make up a high percentage of what’s published. As for why I chose each author, Rachel Pollack (who is also a trans-women and even less represented in SF) has a new book out, The Child Eater, and it’s about time I read UF. Nicola Griffin also has a new book out, Hild, but I bought Ammonite when I  was about 1/3 into Slow River because I found her writing remarkable. Karen Joy Fowler, again, has a new book out (until I wrote this I didn’t actually make that connection between all three), We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, which I picked up as an ebook. I’ve been put off by the blurb of Sarah Canary for ages. Somehow I came across another blurb which completely changed my mind.

Bear Grylls A Surval Guide to Life: I should have photographed Your Life – Train For It as they go hand in hand. Put this down in the ‘life challenging’ category as on a personal note I’ve been trying to improve different aspects of my personal life and his fitness book is helping with that so why not try his thoughts on life?

About Writing by Samuel Delany: This blog started as an offshoot of my writing blog when I was studying for my Creative and Professional Writing degree a few years ago and my passion with reading feeds my writing side and my passion for writing feeds the blog – though I don’t want to be seen as an ‘aspiring’ writer who blogs. No hidden agenda here just sharing good books. But the opening essay has completely changed by focus on my own writing and the struggles I’ve been having with it. It also, quite funnily, contradicts a huge aspect of Slow River’s construction, proving every rule has an exemption.

Don’t Point That Thing At Me: Completely new to me but reminded me of The Act of Roger Murgatroyd by Gilbert Adair, which was a fun take on existing crimey tropes.

Mystery Mile: I’m slow reading around the contemporaries of  Gladys Mitchell and Campion seems like a good direction to go in.

Gladys Mitchell: Vintage as releasing the Mrs Bradley Mysteries as a mix of normal print and  POD, as well as ebook, and I’m going to slowly collect all the series so why not keep going as and when?

Reach for Infinity/The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Anthology editor Jonathan Strahan has the most room on my book shelves, including the other two books in the Infinity series and the other seven Best of books. He has me covered in trying to keep up. The other reason is that I’ve bought the majority of Solaris’ anthology output as I want them to keep doing it.

Blythe Spirit by Nöel Coward: This is a keepsake from seeing Angela Lansbury’s performance being the text – and an ending I wasn’t expecting from my memory of the film.

Big Mamma Stories: I’ve probably had this too long to be here but it’s worth pointing it out as it’s from a small press and it’s collection of shorts. It came to my attention being part of this year’s James Tiptree Award honours .

Dead Man’s Hand: Joe R Lansdale’s ‘Dead in the West’ is the only Weird Wild West story I remember reading and this contains a new tale featuring its protagonist Reverend Jebediah Mercer. Plus, I’m exploring the Weird and this linked in a roundabout way to the Western-related ebooks that I’ll be mentioning in Part Two.

The City’s Son by Tom Pollack: I confess to having an early reading copy of this book but when it’s placed next to the next two in the series (The Lady of the Streets is out best month) it didn’t look right – and now it does it.

Fearful Symmetries: Ellen Datlow has the second amount of anthology space on my shelves at home so I try and keep that topped up when I can – plus it’s a small press book that came originally from Kickstarter.

Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: it’s one of my favourite childhood films and this is a re-release of the novelisation with extras.

You’ll be glad to know that’s it until Part Two next weekend. I’m a little scared by how many books I’ve bought over the last few months but it was fun trying to figure out why I bought them.

So, what was the last book you bought and why did you buy it.

7 Thoughts on “What Have You Bought Recently? Part One

  1. My most recent purchase was an ebook–Octavia Butler’s posthumously published Unexpexted Stories. I’m reading it with a group on Twitter–we’ll be discussing it there on the 22nd and 23rd.

  2. I bought the first Magic Kingdom of Landover trilogy and The Deed of Paksenarrion omnibus edition, both for basically the same reason.

    I am getting burned out on really dark epics. I haven’t lost my love for them, they just don’t feel right for summer. I need some humor, some tropes and some positive outcomes.

    I know Kingdom will give me some smiles and I’m told that Paksenarrion isn’t as dark as what I’ve been reading, plus I’m tired of being asked why I didn’t read it years ago :>)

    I also bought “The Book of Weird and Unusual Trivia.” Aside from loving that sort of thing, I’m hoping it will give me some ideas for a few fun blog posts.

    eBooks aren’t working out so well for me. Seems like 90% of those are duds. I keep telling myself not to buy any more.

    • Gav Reads on 20 July, 2014 at 8:58 pm said:

      Maybe that’s what puts me off the current crop of epic fantasy with its focus on Grimdark. I have the ebook of The Deed keep meaning to try it.

  3. I tend to purchase a lot of older titles, authors that I’m collecting. Recently picked up Galapagos and Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut, and a friend gifted me with a special edition of A Song of Stone by Iain Banks. I while ago I bought Life’s Lottery by Kim Newman, it looked like a weird choose your own adventure type thing, and that’s exactly what it was!

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